Military Declares State Of Emergency, Arrests, Dissolves Civilian Government in Sudan

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Sudan has proclaimed a state of emergency after the military overthrew civilian administration and jailed political leaders.
Political infighting, according to Gen Abdel Fattah Burhan, who was heading a combined council with civilian officials.

Protesters have also rushed to the streets of Khartoum, the capital city, where gunfire has been reported.

Military and civilian officials have been at odds since Omar Al-government Bashir’s was deposed two years ago, resulting in a transitional government.

Despite the country’s economic woes, BBC News claims that international backing has increased and a military coup has put the country in jeopardy.
A video showed how demonstrators were beaten up.

Military and civilian officials have been at odds since Omar Al-government Bashir’s was deposed two years ago, resulting in a transitional government.

Despite the country’s economic woes, BBC News claims that international backing has increased and a military coup has put the country in jeopardy.

Protesters manning illuminated barricades and accessing the area near the military’s headquarters were seen on film.

“We are ready to risk our lives for the democratic transition in Sudan,” one of the protestors, Haitham Mohamed, told journalists.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Abdallah Hamdok, as well as members of his cabinet, are said to have been placed under house arrest.

Since Omar Al-government Bashir’s deposition two years ago, military and civilian leaders have been at strife, resulting in a transitional administration.
Despite the country’s economic difficulties, BBC News reports that foreign support has grown and that a military coup has put the country in peril.

On film, protesters were seen manning illuminated barriers and entering the area near the military’s headquarters.

One of the protestors, Haitham Mohamed, told journalists, “We are ready to risk our lives for the democratic change in Sudan.”

Prime Minister Abdallah Hamdok and members of his government are alleged to have been placed under house arrest in the meanwhile.

“We will not leave the streets until the civilian government and the transition are restored,” declared demonstrator Sawsan Bashir.

The internet went down, and army and paramilitary soldiers were stationed across the city, according to reports.

The airport in Khartoum was also shuttered, and international flights were halted, while the military’s action drew international censure.
Military arrests of civilian leaders, according to the UK’s special envoy for Sudan and South Sudan, Robert Fairweather, are “a betrayal of the revolution, the transition, and the Sudanese people.”

The United States, the United Nations, the European Union, and the Arab League have all expressed grave concern.

In recent weeks, Khartoum has seen a sharp rise in tension as many fear a hostile takeover of power.
The indications have been there for a long time.

In Khartoum, a pro-military sit-in in front of the presidential palace was perceived as scripted to lead to a coup.

It made no attempt to hide its true intent. Protesters called on the military to depose “failed” civilian officials.

It was an extraordinary attempt to legitimize a military takeover by posing as a popular demonstration.

A counter-protest was held nearly a week later. Huge numbers rallied in support of the civilian administration this time.

Pro-democracy groups have called for greater protests to “fight a military coup,” Sudan could be set for yet another period of a showdown between the armed forces and the people.

The country has made huge strides in normalising ties with the West and unlocking much-needed funding streams as the promise of transition to democracy has kept many Sudanese and the country’s allies hopeful but all that could be at risk now.

Since President Bashir’s overthrow in 2019 following months of mass unrest, the military and civilian transitional government have ruled together.

The Sovereign Council was established as part of a power-sharing agreement between the military and a loose coalition of organisations known as the Forces for Freedom and Change (FFC).

It was set to administer the country for another year, with the goal of conducting elections and handing over power to civilians.

However, the agreement was always tumultuous, with a slew of competing political factions and military divisions.

Tensions rose even worse after a failed coup attempt ascribed to Bashir’s supporters in September.
Sudan has been unable to come up with a viable political system.

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